Mysterious Missing Part Story About Malcolm X’s You Never Heard

Mysterious Missing Part Story About Malcolm X's You Never Heard

The revolutionary flames of black nationalism that Malcolm X had sparked could not be extinguished when he was slain in 1965. If anything, the name ” Malcolm X” is deeply etched in the minds of millions of people around the world, not just in the United States. However, here was a man whose life had been largely misinterpreted and whose words and acts had been incorrectly labeled as racial ” hate speech. “

With his life, he aimed to raise revolutionary awareness among Black people in America, encouraging them to be proud of their identity in order to outmaneuver the oppressive white capitalist system; a rising Black nationalism.

Malcolm X’ s valor has been immortalized in a wealth of literature, and his martyrdom continues to inspire millions across the world. However, such facile mainstream praise obscures crucial parts of his revolutionary struggle against white supremacy and capitalism.

Malcolm X’ s activities after his public breakup with Elijah Muhamad and expulsion from the Nation of Islam are a hazy chapter in his illustrious but tumultuous revolutionary career. He is frequently portrayed as a vile and ” violent” monster who headed an irresponsible Afro- American freedom movement.

The Missing Chapter

Malcom X’ s disillusionment with the Nation of Islam, which he accused of preaching brotherhood but not implementing it, undoubtedly sparked profound self- awareness and enlightenment in him. He realized that in order to be in solidarity with all black people around the world, the Afro- American struggle needed to be placed in its proper worldwide context.

As a result, the Organization of Afro- American Unity, which he zealously established in the final years of his life, does not receive the recognition it deserves. For him, it was a critical learning curve that was cut short, but one that he would never forget.

In the spring of 1964, Malcolm X founded the Organization of Afro- American Unity under extremely difficult circumstances. His radicalism (which drew a large following) put him under constant investigation on a local and international level.

Malcolm X’ s death fueled the nascent but fervent dream of an ” exceptionally capable commander from the battlefield. . . to teach the officers and organize the troops for an army of Afro- American emancipation. ” In today’ s society, Malcolm X’ s radical and enlightened teachings, provided through the Organization of Afro- American Unity, must be conveyed with greater urgency and honesty.

Malcolm X created this new movement to address the Nation of Islam’ s inefficiencies. He envisioned a revolutionary entity that was all- encompassing, internationalist in outlook, and oblivious to ethnic and socioeconomic divides. It was no longer the ” Negro fight” for him– it was the ” Black struggle. “

He traveled to African and Asian countries such as Ghana, Liberia, Kenya, Tanzania, Egypt, Kuwait, Algeria, Lebanon, and Guinea after leaving the Black Muslim movement, where he met revolutionary leaders such as Gamal Abdel Nasser, Julius Nyerere, Jomo Kenyatta, Milton Obote, Nnandi Azikiwe, Sekou Toure, and Kwame Nkrumah.

In the latter months of Malcolm X’ s life, he resurrected revolutionary ideology and practice. According to Malcolm X, the Afro- American civil rights struggle was not limited to North America. It had to align itself with the continent’ s growing wave of revolutionary nationalist independence movements. “

The world is in crisis, ” he declared, and the Negro fight in America had to stand in solidarity with revolutionary movements in Latin America, the Caribbean islands, and Asia. Because the Organization of Afro- American Unity covered ” all mankind, ” he dropped the rigorous stance of racial segregation as the model for black emancipation in America.

In a February 1965 talk, he stated that the first step for those connected with the organization was to ” come up with a program that would internationalize our concerns and let the world recognize that our problem was no longer a Negro or an American problem, but a human problem. ” ” Humanity’ s problem. “

Restoring Black Pride By Linking African And Afro- American History

Malcolm X patiently but joyfully explained, through the newly formed Organization for African Unity, how the plight of the black man in America was inextricably linked to history: Black ancient civilizations, slavery, and colonialism.

His biography establishes him as a demagogue and a pragmatic who recognized that the ” Negro” label had stolen the history of black people in the Western hemisphere. In the Western hemisphere, black people had no language, religion, customs, or beliefs— no identity.

Now, if we don’ t travel back in time and figure out how we got here, we’ ll believe we’ ve always been this way. You have previously achieved a higher level and made significant contributions to society, culture, science, and so on.

In January 1964, Malcolm X remarked this, giving the emerging movement a broader worldwide vision so that the black person on 8th Avenue or Lenox Avenue could see how events in South Vietnam or the Congo directly affected his livelihood– ” his income, his reception or lack of reception in society. “

The Global Struggle Hor Human Rights

The ” world was in jeopardy, ” Malcolm X explained, because of the manipulations of white capitalists hell- bent on sustaining the illegitimate system of racism and segregation– and how ” power balances” were shifting. The fight was against white supremacy perpetrated by racial segregationists, notably the governing class in Western civilisation, and not all white people were morally disastrous in achieving global peace.

The term ” civil rights” battle was abhorred by Malcolm X. This limited the black cause to the United States of America. As a result, there are fewer allies and unity. The struggle had to be dubbed the ” human rights” struggle, because Afro- American nationalism would thus become universal, transcending American borders: a global Black nationalism. The United Nations Charter serves as justification. More worldwide solidarity and alliances are needed.

Despite limited resources and terrible demonization, Malcolm X remained steadfast in his commitment to awaken not only Afro- Americans but the entire globe to the objective truth– that the ” dark world is rising. ” Afro- Americans now had the opportunity to bring about the ” fall of the white world, ” and they needed to take advantage of it. He was adamant that this was not racist talk.

His argument was essentially historical in nature. And look at how the Europeans twisted it. In the backdrop of the 1960s, when oppressed peoples in Africa, Latin America, and Asia rose up against white supremacist imperialism, Malcolm X brimmed with the worldwide vision of comprehensive black emancipation. In addition, the mainstream media pays little attention to this chapter.

The Historical Link Between Africa And Afro- Africa

Malcolm X patiently but joyfully explained, through the newly formed Organization for African Unity, how the plight of the black man in America was inextricably linked to history: Black ancient civilizations, slavery, and colonialism.

His biography establishes him as a demagogue and a pragmatic who recognized that the ” Negro” label had stolen the history of black people in the Western hemisphere. In the Western hemisphere, black people had no language, religion, customs, or beliefs— no identity.

Now, if we don’ t go back in time and figure out how we got here, we’ ll believe we’ ve always been this way. . . You had previously achieved a higher level and had made significant contributions to society, culture, science, and so on.

In January 1964, Malcolm X said this, giving the nascent movement a broader international scope so that the black people on 8th Avenue or Lenox Avenue could see how events in South Vietnam or the Congo directly affected their livelihood, salary, and reception in society.

As a result, blacks, rather than negros, would be ” immediately engaged in things worldwide. ” To broaden the scope of Afro- Americans, he intended the Organization of Afro- American Unity to create a culture of ” broadened reading habits. “

He refused to be labeled a ” racist” who instigated ” hate speech” and ” violence” — clearly the press’ s cheap white supremacist propaganda. He contended that racists in power could not carry out their heinous crimes against the ” dark world” without the consent of the general population— the white population.

He claimed that advancing counter- narratives based on one’ s identity (being black) should not be considered racism or hate speech. Telling black people to fight ongoing state violence was not violent; when confronted with unimaginable misery and injustice, one cannot sit back and do nothing.

As a result, he demonstrated how ancient civilizations were established by blacks on the African continent, the modern Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent. Civilizations in Asia are far ahead of those in Europe. He named the Egyptians, Sumerians, Dravidians, Carthage (headed by Hannibal, who was black but ” whitened by Hollywood” ), and Ethiopians as examples.

The West African cultures of Ghana (an area that stretches beyond modern- day Ghana), Mali, and the Moors are included. Malcolm X refused to participate in Negro History Week because it was a fabrication that led the world to believe that black history began on slave plantations.

The Afro- American had to identify with and own the rich legacy of ancient black civilizations. They were also intended to identify with the liberation movements that were gaining traction in Africa, Latin America, and Asia.

Malcolm X’ s visits to Africa and Asia were crucial in shaping the sophisticated discourse that he led through the Organization of Afro- American Unity— which is the missing chapter in Malcolm X’ s life as depicted in the mainstream media and literature. This, according

to Malcolm X, this was the only way to free the black race from the grip of white capitalist hegemony, which was wreaking havoc on the planet. Throughout it all, he maintained his Muslim identity. He just expanded its scope and objectivity for everyone’ s emancipation.

The Resurrection Of The Missing Chapter

Malcolm X’ s crystal- clear history offered under the Organization of Afro- American Unity in his final days sowed potent seeds for a robust black nationalism. With their black pride restored, Afro- Americans would gladly identify with the African continent, resulting in massive black solidarity that would overcome the oppressive capitalist system.

Given that Malcolm X had not yet declared himself a Marxist, this would forge an unbreakable link between black nationalism and revolutionary socialism. His assassination put an end to the ” latent socialism” he was instilling through black nationalist movements.

This is significant since the liberation movements he supported around the world were founded on communist principles. The seeds he planted sowed key patterns of solidarity between black nationalism and socialism around the world, rooted in Afro- American movements for human rights.

Nonetheless, the work he did via the Organization of Afro- American Unity, which he did under enormous adversity, must be continued with renewed zeal. The Organization of Afro- American Unity is unquestionably Malcolm X’ s missing chapter, as it was the catalyst for his death.

For decades, his assassination remained a mystery until Ray Woods (an undercover cop at the time) confessed on his deathbed that he was responsible for Malcolm X’ s death by arranging the arrest of his security detail days before he was shot at the Audubon Hall in New York. This was done in order for Malcolm X to be unguarded on the day of his assassination. The biography of Malcolm X’ s lost chapter must be vigorously revitalized.

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